(1) Ketone Slims – best keto diet

How to Start the Keto Diet Plan – Keto Diet For Beginners

How to Start the Keto Diet Plan – Keto Diet For Beginners

How to Start the Keto Diet Plan – Keto Diet For Beginners

The exact ratio of recommended macronutrients (or your “macros”) in your daily regimen (grams of carbs vs. fat vs. protein) will differ depending on your specific goals and current state of health. Your age, gender, level of activity and current body composition can also play a role in determining your carb versus fat intake.

Historically, a targeted keto diet consists of limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” is the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once eaten, most people don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment.

In other words, total carbs – grams of fiber = net carbs. That’s the carb counts that matter most.

On a “strict” (standard) keto diet, fats typically provides about 70 percent to 80 percent of total daily calories, protein about 15 percent to 20 percent, and carbohydrates just around 5 percent. However, a more “moderate” approach to the keto diet is also a good option for many people that can allow for an easier transition into very low-carb eating and more flexibility (more on these types of plans below).

What can you eat on a keto diet? Here are some good keto rules for how to do the keto diet regardless of the plan you follow:

1. Do not protein load

Something that makes the keto diet different from other low-carb diets is that it does not “protein-load.” Protein is not as big a part of the keto diet as fat is. Reason being: In small amounts, the body can change protein to glucose, which means if you eat too much of it, especially while in the beginning stages, it will slow down your body’s transition into ketosis.

Protein intake should be between one and 1.5 grams per kilogram of your ideal body weight. To convert pounds to kilograms, divide your ideal weight by 2.2. For example, a woman who weighs 150 pounds (68 kilograms) should get about 68–102 grams of protein daily.

2. Track your macros

Your “macros” are your grams of fat, protein and net carbs (not to be confused with calorie counting!). Tracking your macros and net carbs can be tricky, so I advise you download a keto app that includes a keto diet calculator. It will help keep you on track.

3. Consider using some keto supplements for greater success

A popular keto supplement are exogenous ketones (popularly called “keto diet pills”) that may help you achieve results earlier as well as remain in that state. (Don’t confuse exogenous ketones with raspberry ketones, as the latter don’t raise ketone levels in the body or mimic endogenous ketones, so you wouldn’t use raspberry ketones in your regimen.)

Also, consider supplementing with the amino acid leucine, as it can be broken down directly into acetyl-CoA, making it one of the most important ketogenic amino acids in the body. While most other amino acids are converted into glucose, the acetyl-CoA formed from leucine can be used to make ketone bodies. It’s also present in keto friendly foods like eggs and cottage cheese.

4. Drink water!

It’s important to also drink lots of water, the most important of all keto drinks. Getting enough water helps keep you from feeling fatigued, is important for digestion and aids in hunger suppression. It’s also needed for detoxification. Aim to drink 10–12 eight-ounce glasses a day.

5. Do NOT cheat

Lastly, no cheat days and not even cheat meals on the keto diet! Why?! Because a meal with far too many carbs will take you right out of ketosis and put you back at square one.

That being said, if you do succumb and indulge in a cheat meal, expect a return of some of the keto flu symptoms … but also be comforted by the knowledge that if you’re reached ketosis in the past, your body will be able to get back soon again and perhaps more quickly than originally.

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